“Cascades on Weeping Wall”

Cascades on Weeping Wall, Glacier National Park, Montana (c) Mike Utley

NP34-2(S)—Cascades on Weeping Wall, Glacier National Park, Montana
This weeping wall of cascading falls stands along Going to the Sun Road in Glacier National Park, Montana. A slow shutter speed rendered the water as silky gossamer threads against the black rocks. (Canon gear, Fuji Velvia ISO 50)

35 thoughts on ““Cascades on Weeping Wall”

  1. The white cascades falling on the dark background are just thrilling to watch. Felt like it’d be refreshening if I just sat right there, especially on a hot summer day, and let the water flow on me. This is gorgeous indeed, Mike. 😊

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks, Lamittan. Glacier National Park is a pretty cool place. I mean, this sight was just on the side of the road! It doesn’t even compare to the majesty and splendor of the mountains and lakes and forests and wild flowers and animas that make up the park. Amazing place indeed. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, David. It was a fun trip but rather whirlwind in nature as we had only one day to spend in the park–and it’s a huge park. I made a lot of images of various features of the park. I’d love to return someday and spend a week or so exploring. One day isn’t enough. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks, Xenia. It really is a calming scene. What’s interesting to ponder is that if I’d used a fast shutter speed to freeze the water in motion, it would have created a chaotic, energetic image rather than this soothing, serene image. Such a duality in the same place and time, all dependent upon our perspective. I’m glad you liked this one. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. This is so beautiful, Mike. Thanks for explaining how you got that heavenly water falling effect. Could stare at this for hours and still keep wondering about it. You are an amazing photographer. Awesome! Inspiring! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. You’re too kind, Terveen! Thanks a bunch for your wonderful comment. I love the effect of slow shutter speeds on moving water. It creates such an atmospheric, contemplative scene, whether it’s a waterfall or a river or ocean waves on the shore. So relaxing. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I especially love the unspoken theme of this photograph: the black rock is the great mystery of the nature, and your photographic skill turned the water into an image of a silk curtain that is floating over it. leading your reader a vast imagining …..you are a real nature lover and a poetic thinker. I love it.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Drawing back the curtain is essential in revealing the wonders of nature. The water truly does resemble a silk veil, inviting the onlooker to explore behind it. There’s also the constant whispering of the water on the rocks, imparting deep secrets to those who listen. I always appreciate your contemplative and inspiring perspectives. Thanks so much for your kind words as always! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. the untouched divining beauty of this photograph reminds me of a earlier poem I wrote when a friend of mine talked about his concern over the urbanizing construction taking over primitive landscape like this.

        The great dressmaker
        (inspired by friend’s tricky talk)

        the promoter for fancy dancing parties
        has turned open-air storage of antiques
        into a quick sketch stand for plaids
        begging-in-the-street grandmother sits
        in the forest of scissors
        pleading passersby to pause for a look
        the rulers of dimensions
        introduce themselves
        to the lovely audience
        in a crowded room

        Liked by 1 person

    2. This poem of yours is filled with such profound symbolism. The imagery (you’re a master of fine imagery) is stunning and jarring and thought-provoking. This piece reminds me of a development company that erected a housing complex near the base of Wilson Arch, a famous sandstone arch which is about an hour and a half from where I live. I was so angry when I saw this intrusion into such a beautiful and wild natural setting, and all so the developers could make a few $. It’s shameful. I love how your poem speaks to the sadness of the lost wilderness and the death of what I consider sacred beauty. Such a wonderful piece. 🙂

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    1. Thanks, Scarlett. You’re right–the resemblance to delicate icicles is certainly there. I’ve seen photos of this Weeping Wall during winter and its character is completely different. It’s so intriguing how a scene can have so many different personalities depending on the season, lighting, weather and perspectives of the viewer. 🙂

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    1. Thanks, Kirsten. I love waterfalls. There aren’t many in my immediate area, but when I lived in Oregon they were scattered all over the place. In the mountains of Colorado you can find plenty of waterfalls. There are several in Glacier National Park, Montana that I didn’t get to see due to time constraints. My favorite waterfall area is Silver Falls State Park, about 20 miles outside of Salem, OR. There are about ten falls in what always struck me as such primordial setting–thick forests, ferns, rivers, mist and stunning falls. I half-expected to see dinosaurs roaming about every time I was there. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Mark. It was an amazing–but way too brief–foray into Glacier National Park. Always wanted to return and spend a lot more time but never got the opportunity. Are there many waterfalls in your neck o’ the woods?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Not a lot like that. I was out for a walk in an unfamiliar town forest a couple of years back and my plan was to visit the falls identified on the map. Well, falls might have been the overstatement of the year! The water fell over the rocks but the rocks weren’t much higher than my knee. It was kind of humourous once I realized I was standing on the falls.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Jeff. I was just telling Kirsten above that my favorite waterfall location is Silver Falls State Park outside of Salem, OR. I was there a couple of times back in the mid-’90s–once in September and then again in January–and was blown away at the difference in the falls themselves (water volume) and the overall atmosphere. It’s one of those places that seems lost to time, like stepping back few million years into the past. There’s also a waterfall route that bypasses Portland. I didn’t get to explore it much. And, of course, Multnomah Falls along the Columbia River Gorge. Oregon is a wonderful place for waterfalls. You’re a lucky fellow to be able to visit such beauty regularly! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I just read your wonderful poem on your blog and left a message there but wanted to say thank you so much here as well. I’m honored that my photograph inspired you to write such a sublime piece of poetry. I appreciate your kindness and support so much. The best thing about WordPress is the amazing people I’ve bumped into since I began blogging six months ago. Such a sense of community and encouragement. Thanks for always helping me see the world in new ways. 🙂

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    1. Why thank you, sir! It really is a meditative image, and it was such a calming, contemplative scene. There’s almost nothing quite as basic as rock and water, and if you consider the effects water has on rocks, it makes it even more dynamic. Time is the Great Equalizer, and those gossamer threads will smooth even the most jagged rocks eventually. 🙂

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