“A Few Haiku (26)”

(c) 2022 by Michael L. Utley

(#151)

drifting blizzard snow
not deep enough to inter
all the world’s sins

…..

(#152)

fallow field
without love and compassion
there can be no hope

…..

(#153)

the thresher’s flail
I am not yet able to
leave my past behind

…..

(#154)

iced boughs bend in shame
winter’s woe too bitter for
weeping willow’s tears

…..

(#155)

silent winter night
sound of my heart’s muffled cries
bereft of echoes

…..

(#156)

bitter reckoning
seeds of love in time shall meet
the harvester’s scythe

35 thoughts on ““A Few Haiku (26)”

  1. Your all Haikus are imaginary realistic . For penetrating deep into the world sin , the snow has to be thick or pointed . Similarly , from fallow field , without the seeds of love and compassion , you cannot hope much . Thanks ! Happy New Year !

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks, Terveen. I can’t wait for spring, can you tell? ๐Ÿ˜€ But seriously, I actually enjoy writing these somber, bleak themes, especially this time of year. The landscape just exudes sadness, loneliness and loss. This resonates with me deeply. I always appreciate your comments and thanks for taking time to read. ๐Ÿ™‚

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    2. “Sadness is like that familiar friend with whom you can sit and share the silence…” Oh, this is beautifully stated, Terveen, and completely accurate. It’s also smile-inducing and has brightened my morning, so thank you for that. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Grace. It means a lot to receive your kind comments. Keeps me inspired to write during these long, cold days when my muse disappears (apparently, she’s stuck in the snow somewhere). ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. Your kind words always brighten my day, Reena. Thanks for such a nice comment. I suppose I’m drawn to the somber, solemn side of things for many reasons and life experiences. My favorite poet is Sylvia Plath, so that says a a lot about my attraction to sad, dark themes. I’m a hopeful person in real life, but winter just begs for bleak poetry. It’s cathartic for me. Anyway, as always, thanks so much, Reena. Glad you enjoyed these haiku. ๐Ÿ™‚

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    2. This is so true! When late-November arrives, I start to feel like I want to hibernate. Just a feeling of sluggishness, hunger and fatigue, and all I want to do is sleep until springtime arrives (I think some of my ancestors must have been bears…). ๐Ÿ˜€

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    1. Thanks, Mark. It’s been cold here. At this moment, the sky is heavy and looks like it wants to snow again. I’ve been in a funk lately–always happens this time of year–and it’s caused a bit of a drought in my writing as well as tinging everything I write with an overwhelming grayness. Plus, I saw on your latest essay at your blog that my birthday falls in the micro season of Major Cold, so there’s that, too! ๐Ÿ˜€ Oh well. I’m glad you liked these. Always pleased to know my words resonate with people. ๐Ÿ™‚

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      1. Hi Mike, I hear that about the cold and the winter leading towards a funk. It’s part of the reason I have immersed myself in the study of seasonal changes. It helps me reorient my mind a bit. Although it doesn’t always work

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    1. Thanks, David. Gotta admit your “cutting” remark cracked a smile on my unshaven mug! Thanks for that, good sir! ๐Ÿ˜€ Yeah, that last one is brutal. Personal experience and all that… Honestly, I was just glad to be able to write something today. I’ve been in a slump recently–burned-out and numb-minded–so putting words together has been tough. As always, thanks for reading and commenting. It means a lot to me. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  2. These haiku poems are highly stystic and detailed. Look at this: “the thresherโ€™s flail, I am not yet able to leave my past behind.” What an incredible one! All of them, are nicely done. Keep writing, keep touching our lives, my friend Mike.

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    1. Thank you kindly, Lamittan! Your positive reviews do so much to energize me and encourage me to continue writing. I do like the concept of the thresher’s flail haiku–the imagery jumped out at me and the symbolism was spot-on regarding how grain needs to shed its husk to be usable. My “husk” is my past that haunts me, which is why I write about this theme so often. I’m so glad you enjoyed this one. As I mentioned to David above, I’m just happy I was able to pen something today. Tomorrow is a new day, and hopefully new inspiration. Thanks again, Lamittan! ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. Thanks, Jeff. I grew up on a farm so the concept of the fallow field has made its way into several of my poems. There’s a terrible loneliness that manifests itself in a fallow field; where nothing is planted, nothing grows (or even worse–weeds proliferate). We need more sowers of love and compassion in this world so hope can abound. I’m glad you liked this one. Thanks for the kind comment and for reading. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  3. It is incredible how vivid the imagery is in each of these brilliantly composed haikus! It is never this cold where I live, but I think I carry within me a perpetual Winter so I can relate with these.

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    1. Thanks, Aaysid. I think all of us carry winter around within us to one degree or another, but some are better at shoveling their walks than others, if that makes sense! Some people seems to be snowed-in more often from an emotional standpoint. Memories of this happening in real-life abound for me since I was raised on a farm eighteen miles from the nearest town. The farm was at 7,000 feet elevation, so we had cold winters. We’d get snowed-in and have to wait hours for the road crews to plow us out. It’s a sense of helplessness when there’s three feet of snow and you’re pretty much stuck until help arrives. I feel snowed-in emotionally sometimes. Writing about it is like a snow plow coming to the rescue, clearing the roads so I can go about my day again. So, winter can be harsh for me and other people, but it can also be inspiration for getting words onto paper or screen. Anyway, forgive my rambling and thanks as always for your kind words. I really appreciate it. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  4. “fallow field
    without love and compassion
    there can be no hope”

    “iced boughs bend in shame
    winterโ€™s woe too bitter for
    weeping willowโ€™s tears”

    this resonates in me like sunshine penetrating and flowing in my blood. Love and compassion is the land of seeds where hope is grown. Love and compassion is what de-ice the boughs and wipes the tears off the willow.

    love your powerful thoughts.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much for such a wonderful comment. These words of yours are powerful and so true: “Love and compassion is the land of seeds where hope is grown. Love and compassion is what de-ice the boughs and wipes the tears off the willow.” Such a beautiful way of seeing the world. Thanks again for the kind words. I truly appreciate your taking the time to read and comment. It really made my day. ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. Thanks, Rhyan. “Icy isolation” is a perfect way to put it (rolls off the ol’ tongue really nicely, too). All of these haiku are so serious…I think I left my sense of humor in my other pants… *rimshot* Oh well. I enjoy dark poetry. *glances furtively at complete works of Sylvia Plath on bookshelf* I suppose this is what makes it to paper (or screen) when depression and S.A.D. come to visit. I’m sort of slumping at the moment, staring at the blank page/screen and hearing nothing but the wind blowing in my head, hoping the words will return. Thanks as always for the kind comment. Much appreciated. ๐Ÿ™‚

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