“A Few Haiku (50)”

(c) 2022 by Michael L. Utley

(#295)

in konara copse
ferns beckon
with come-hither fingers

…..

(#296)

white chrysanthemum
she sleeps in the cool embrace
of oak shadows

…..

(#297)

in the garden
corn silk and laughter
my mother’s memories

…..

(#298)

her impression left
on hand-made rice cakes
and my heart

…..

(#299)

I’ll cross the footbridge
soon enough but for now
let me enjoy the stream

…..

(#300)

live long enough
even the mountain will betray you
the forked path

49 thoughts on ““A Few Haiku (50)”

    1. Thank you, Saima. I’m so pleased to know these held meaning for you. Half of these refer to my late mother (296, 297, 298) so they have deeper meaning for me. I’m so glad to see you here in the comments, too! It’s always a delight to read what you have to say. I hope you’re doing well! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, I can feel it, dear Mike.. and felt those verses so deeply, as all mothers are alike and they have no replacement. Thank you, my friend.. yes I’m okπŸ™‚ how are you doing? And the election results?

        Liked by 1 person

    2. I’m doing all right, I suppose. Not quite as stressed as I was leading up to the election. The good guys did amazingly well, but we still lost control of the House of Representatives, which is going to result in a split Congress (we still have a razor-thin majority in the Senate). What this means is there will be utter chaos for the next two years as the bad guys go on their Revenge Tour to punish all those who are currently investigating trump’s many crimes. Nothing constructive will take place, and the spectre of drastic cuts to–or even the elimination of–vital social safety net programs is very, very real now. So, this could have a serious impact my life. More worries, in other words…but we avoided the dreaded red wave, so our losses weren’t anywhere near as bad as pundits predicted. America is a mess right now, Saima. I hope you’ll keep us in your thoughts. I’m glad I have an outlet here on WordPress to de-stress and talk with friends like you and others. It really helps me keep things in perspective, so thank you for that, my friend. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Good to know that you are not as stressed as before, my dear friend. Yes, I was checking the America’s election results after you told us. Good to know that the good guys have done well. Let’s hope for the good, if not best.. dear Mike. I can understand what you are talking about.. people suffer due to all this politics. My country is facing many problems due to the corrupt politicians ruling the country for decades.. and the people suffer. Anyway, I try to stay away from News nowπŸ˜€ Thank you, Mike. We also love when you share with us.. keep writing, we love your words and these days I find solace in beautiful words like yours, or photos of Nature πŸ’•shared by different friends on WordPressπŸ™‚ Take good care of yourself my friend.

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    1. Many thanks, Cindy. The simplicity of this form is what is so attractive and intriguing to me. It’s amazing what can be expressed in so few words. I’m still learning (and will always be learning), so your kind support is so encouraging. I’m super-stoked to know you enjoy my writing (I’m a huge fan of yours)! Much appreciated, my friend. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I knew I missed a comment from you and happy I went back to find it. “Now you see it, now you don’t and then maybe n spam now I’m here. We are always learning and yet you have a way of seeing everything as it is and expressing it to the fullest. Small words say more often and I go jabbering on… lol. I do love your work and thanks always for appreciating mine!! very sweet! xo❀️

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Thanks a bunch, Cindy. You’re really too kind, you know? πŸ™‚ I’m glad to have you here and always delighted to see you stop by. You have a way of brightening up the place wherever you go! Thanks for that, my friend. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much. I really enjoy writing these, even (or perhaps especially) the cynical ones like #300. Most of my poetry is decidedly melancholy so I suppose it was only fitting to squeeze #300 in here! Anyway, I’m truly grateful for your kind words. Much appreciated. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Beautiful, as always. I find it interesting that you sometimes invert the “classic haiku” pattern of having the slightly separate thought at the end. #296, for example, how you have the white chrysanthemums at the beginning. I’m wondering if you’ll start a new trend. Maybe call in a MikeU. 😁

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much. “MikeU!” That’s sort of brilliant (and witty, too)! πŸ˜€ An interesting thing is that I’ve been reading a lot of Basho’s work lately (he published a little over 1,000 haiku in his life). He often alternated the decisive thought between the first and last line, utilizing the kireji (cutting word) at the end of line one or line two depending on which worked best. For fun, I looked at twenty-five random Basho haiku and found he placed the “theme line” on line three only ten times out of those twenty-five haiku, while twelve times he placed it as the first line (the other three had no classical form). I’ve read his entire collection and was intrigued by his choice in this regard. Sometimes it just has a better feel to start with the theme line (kireji at the end of line one); other times it works better at the end (kireji at the end of line two). You should see me when I’m editing these. I’m flipping them back and forth several times to determine which feels best to me. It’s sort of agonizing at times to get that proper fit. So, I end up with a varied approach, depending on what seems to work for each individual haiku. Honestly, it adds to the fun and satisfaction I feel when I write these. It’s part of the challenge. I don’t always get it right–I’m still learning–and I can’t tell you how many haiku and senryu I’ve edited and re-edited, only to end up banishing them to the ether. Sometimes nothing works at all. I might keep one line and try a different approach. I have a folder with haiku fragments that I want to use in future haiku, but right now they’re just stray lines seeking a home somewhere, awaiting adoption.

      Anyway, thanks for the kind words. I appreciate your insights so much. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That’s so interesting about Basho. You’re clearly quite a Haiku aficionado. My grandfather published 2 or 3 books of Haiku. A lot of them were a little beyond me but the one that we all remember went something like this:

        ajar ajar!
        the magpie cries
        to the door of morning
        by: Norman Stokes

        Liked by 1 person

    2. That is so cool your grandfather was a published poet! It runs in your family! I don’t know of anyone else among my relatives who ever wrote and sought publication, although I have a couple of nephews who are immensely talented writers. I love the imagery and sounds in your grandfather’s haiku. Magpies were so ubiquitous on the farm where I was raised. I mean those birds were everywhere. So this haiku really hits home with me. So well written and such a fun fact that your grandfather was a writer, too. A quick search has turned up some of his haiku. They’re brilliant! It’s a site called http://www.haikuoz.org (you’re probably already aware of this site) and it listed three haiku by Norman Stokes. (before a page error appeared). Here’s the link:

      https://www.haikuoz.org/faha/haiku.html

      Thanks for sharing this with me. I’m so impressed! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much! It’s a wonderful feeling to know you enjoy these poems. I love writing about nature. The natural world is so inspirational and magical. I appreciate your kind support and I’m glad to have you visit and read my words. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much, Peggy. Nature is pretty all-encompassing in my writing, I suppose. It’s where I find peace and where I can be myself. You spoil me with your kind words! I truly appreciate it and I’m so pleased to know you like what I write. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Xenia. It’s been seven and a half years now that she’s been gone and I’ve only recently begun to write about her. I hope that she’d enjoy these haiku about her. She was definitely worthy of poetry, even though she really didn’t understand it. She prided herself on being a simple farm wife, mother and grandmother, but she was so much more than that. I hope to see my mom appear in more of my writing in the future. Thanks so much for your kind words. I’m grateful for your support, my friend. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Diana. It’s been so good to have the words flowing again (knocks on wood). πŸ™‚ Some of the stress has abated so things feel a bit lighter. The haiku about my mom flowed easily, and I’m glad. She wasn’t much into poetry, but she was always supportive of my writing, music and photography. I like to think she’d approve of my blog and would be tickled to know she’s the subject of some o f my poetry. πŸ™‚

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  2. I love the contrast of feelings. Yes, a mother’s love and the day we fear to be betrayed. You’ve packed in a lot of wise truths and emotions, Mike. And yes, let’s linger and enjoy what time has to offer us. Awesome writing! Meddles with the heart. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Many thanks, Terveen. Yes, there’s definitely some contrasting ideas in this collection. Things were flowing along nicely, and then suddenly my mind said, “Enough happiness! Write something curmudgeonly!” πŸ˜€ Hence, #300. Ah, the weird mind of a writer, eh? πŸ˜€ I appreciate your kindness, my friend. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Kirsten. I had strong mental images of both of those as well. I’m glad they stood out for you. I hope you’ve been doing well and having fun. Massive thanks for your kind words and sincerely grateful for your visit! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

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